Child Life Insurance Options that Make Sense

The Following is brought to you by: Suncorp.

While child life insurance is often written off as a huge waste of financial resources for a family, with no chance of any kind of return on their investment, there are definitely some options that have been crafted as smart buys for parents.

Most of these options do provide return investment opportunities, at highly affordable rates, while providing a current, and future, safety net for children who may have illnesses or disabilities that might hinder their insurability later in life.

One-Time Premium Coverage

This option is only offered by select insurers, and provides parents the option of paying a one-time premium that will cover a child for up to 23 years.

One such plan, offered by Illinois Mutual, provides a safety net for parents with an ill, or disabled child, for only $300—which works out to only $13 annually. This plan is Mutual’s ChildGUARD policy and the death benefits it includes rise with age:

  • Ages 1 to 13; $5,000 in benefits
  • Ages 13 to 18; $10,000 in benefits
  • Ages 18 to 23; $15,000 in benefits

Furthermore, once this policy has run its course and the child turns 23-years-old, it can then be transferred to a whole policy for up to $100,000 regardless of the child’s previous medical history and insurability.

Employee Group-Benefits

Group-benefit plans are sometimes extended to employees as part of their insurance coverage and will extend past the employee to their spouse and children. These benefits do include death benefits and generally provide coverage for around $5,000 to $25,000 worth of funeral expenses.

Just like most insurance coverage extended to children through an employee’s package, they do expire once the child reaches a certain age. However, there are some plans that will allow a child to spin off their own insurance policy regardless of their lack of insurability anywhere else.

Gerber Life College Plan: Endowment Insurance

This insurance product is an excellent investment for parents who want to insure their child early and set them up for a “face amount” payout once they reach a certain age. These “face amounts” can be for any amount between $10,000 to $150,000; depending upon how much parents want to invest over the course of 18 years.

For example, parents who wish to purchase a $10,000 policy can expect the following:

  • 18-Year Payment Plan (starting from age 7)
  • Monthly Premiums of $33.33
  • $7,200 Total Paid from Premiums
  • Child Receives $10,000 at age 25
  • Total Return Investment of $2,800

While these are affordable rates for any parent, the popularity of this policy plans comes from its added benefits – click here for more information. For one, the “Face Amount” payout of any policy, regardless if its amount, has a guaranteed payout to the child, even if the parent dies and can no longer pay the premiums. Second, the payout can be used for any expense that the child wishes to use it for.

How Much Car Insurance Coverage Do You Need?

The following post is sponsored by Swiftcover car insurance

Car insurance, like most insurances, can seem complicated.  Deciding just how much car insurance coverage you need is the biggest hurdle.  Of course, it’s easy to select the coverage that meets the requirements of your state and the lien holder (of you owe on a loan for the car, you’ve got a lien holder, and it’s likely the bank you borrowed from), but those aren’t the only factors to take into account when deciding on how much coverage you need.  In the end, you’ve got to find a coverage that will meet those requirements, and also fit within your budget.

State Requirements

You’ll want to know what the state requires you to have for insurance.  Any local insurance provider should be able to tell you, but you’ll want to double check if you’re planning on using an out of state or online provider.  If you still owe on your car, the lender on your loan will likely require that you have full coverage, so the state minimums will likely only come into play if you own the car you’ll be insuring.

Lien Holder Requirements

If you owe on your car, you’ve got a lien holder.  The lien holder is whomever you borrowed the money from.  Most (if not all) lenders will require that you carry full coverage insurance on the car.  It has nothing to do with them wanting to make sure you’re safe, and all to do with making sure that should you get in an accident, that they’ll get some of their money for the loan.  While most lien holders won’t require a certain level of insurance (over full coverage), it is a good idea to find out what they require just to make sure that you’re getting the coverage that you need.

Deciding on Coverage Levels

Car AccidentOnce you know the requirements of the state and any lien holders, you’ve got to decide on the level of car insurance coverage you want.  There are two ways to look at this.  The first is that you’ve got to find a coverage and provider that is affordable enough to fit into your budget.  The second is usually the forgotten way of looking at insurance.  The coverage doesn’t just have to fit into your budget, it also needs to cover you against a total loss.  If you have full coverage, but it’s only enough to cover a portion of what you owe on the car, you’ll also want to look at something that’s usually called “Gap Insurance”.  Gap insurance is aptly named in that it is designed to cover any gap between the value of the car and the remaining loan should the car be totaled before you pay it off.  Car insurance can be a combination of three coverages.  A liability coverage (usually what States require), Comp & Collision, and personal injury.  The exact levels that you need will vary based on your situation, but your insurance provider should be able to make recommendations for you.

How Much Deductible for Car Insurance

One of the easiest ways to lower the monthly cost of your car insurance coverage is to raise the deductible on your policy.  This method is a bit of a double-edged sword, however.  Raise it too high, and you might not be able to afford to have the car fixed.  Or, anything short of a major collision may fall under the amount of the deductible.  Again, your insurance provider should be able to help you compare the different deductible levels and help you find one that fits your budget without breaking you if you get in an accident.

The level of coverage that you need is going to be drastically different based on your own individual situation.  Do you own your car, or owe on your car?  Do you have sufficient savings to cover a higher deductible in an emergency?  What are the requirements of your state and any lien holders?  Make sure you know all that information before you go looking for car insurance, and remember to double check any suggestions by an insurance provider.  We’d all like to think that they are all honest, but not all of them are.  Knowing at least a little about what you’re talking about, and the information required to ask informed questions is a huge step towards not getting taken advantage of.

How much do you know about car insurance?  How much have you learned since the first time you bought insurance?

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3 Ways Young Homeowners Can Save $3745 (at least) Each Year

If you recently bought your first home let me congratulate you. This is possibly the very best time to buy real estate that you’ll ever see in your lifetime. You made a smart move. And because you are a smart real estate investor, I know you’ll be interested in taking advantage of the following 3 ways young homeowners can save even more “moolah”.

1. Home Warranty

I owned a home warranty program for years and it was a waste of money. Of course it felt great not to have to worry about running into major unexpected expenses, but the cost just didn’t justify it. First of all, you are stuck with any repair person the home protection company sends out. Next, the deductible you have to pay is often pretty close to the amount you’d have to pay to a contractor of your own choosing. Last, when you do have a major repair, you are stuck (again) with whoever the company sends out unless you are willing to go through a great deal of red tape.

You’re always responsible for upgrades, code changes and any problems associated with misuse or poor maintenance. I cancelled my home protection plan several years ago and it turned out to be a fantastic decision. If you follow my lead on this, you’ll save at least $600 a year.

2. Life Insurance

If you are a young homeowner you might have a young family or plan on having one. As a result, you definitely need life insurance. But when it comes to term life vs. whole life – play it smart. Term life is your best friend. It’s cheap and it does the job. It’s true that at some point (20 or 30 years down the road) your term insurance will expire. But by that time, you may not need life insurance anyway. Term life is so much cheaper than whole life that you can take that savings and invest it. This way probably you’ll have much more than the whole life promises.

One of the biggest problems with whole life (and I feel it’s criminal) is that agents sell you the whole life you can afford because it pays them a whole lot more commission. (Maybe that’s why they call it “whole” life.) And because it buys a great deal less insurance than term, people end up dangerously under-insured. You could save several thousands of dollars each year and have better coverage just by having term instead of whole life insurance. Look into this ASAP.

3. Good Credit Score

Because you are a young homeowner, you’ll be using your credit for a very long time. And you might have to lean on that plastic a lot right now to pay for all that new furniture and appliances. If you able to get even a slightly better credit score, you might end up savings a bundle every month. That’s because a higher credit score will help you get lower interest rates on credit cards and mortgages.

Find out what your score is and make sure there are no errors. If there are mistakes, fix them. You can easily do most of this without paying a cent. You can even get your credit score for free and sign up for services that provide updates whenever there is a change to your rating. This has helped me a great deal.

As a young homeowner you might be facing some pretty hefty expenses and that can be daunting. Take these 3 steps. Dump the home protection plan. Get rid of your whole life insurance and buy term instead. Finally make sure your credit score is as high as possible.

Will you save $3745? I don’t know. You could save a lot more. You’ll never know until you start taking action.

What are the biggest expenses you face as a young homeowner? What have you done to reduce those costs?

This was a guest post written by Neal Frankle. He is a Certified Financial Planner ® and owns Wealth Pilgrim – a great personal finance blog. He writes extensively about ways to help people make smart financial decisions. One of his most in-depth posts was his review of CIT Bank.